Chinese (Traditional)
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Topic "Hygiene" in Chinese (traditional) - total 22 documents

Title: BBQ food safety (video)
Summary: Everyone loves a BBQ, but no one likes getting food poisoning So follow these simple tips to make you BBQ a hit: 1. Keep all food cold and covered until ready to be used 2. Use different plates and utensils for raw and cooked foods 3. Make sure all meats are cooked right the way through so juices run clear 4. Continually replace dips and salads if they’ve been out of the fridge for long 5. Keep food cool and covered when not being served 6. Don’t keep left overs if they’ve been out of the fridge for more than two hours

Title: Cleaning and sanitising in retail food businesses
Summary: This information sheet explains why effective cleaning and sanitising in a food business helps protect the owner and the customers against the spread of bacteria and other organisms that cause foodborne illness. It also contains information on the difference between cleaning and sanitising and how to clean and sanitise by using dishwashers, sinks or spray bottles.

Title: Cooler food safety (video)
Summary: Coolers are a great way to transport your food and drinks, but a poorly packed cooler is also a great way to get sick. So follow these simple steps:
- Choose a cooler with excellent insulation and make sure it’s clean.
- Keep your food in the fridge until just before you’re ready to leave.
- Pack meats, fish and chicken in containers and place at the bottom of the cooler.
- Add cold packs or frozen drinks on top and use a tight fitting lid.


Title: Facts about hand hygiene
Summary: Hand hygiene means cleaning your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub. Good hand hygiene is the most effective way to stop infections spreading. Many infections, such as the common cold and flu, are caused by spreading germs from person to person. Even when your hands look clean they can still be carrying germs. This is because they are so small that you just can’t see them. This is why when we touch other people or objects we can spread germs without even realising it.

Title: Food poisoning and how to prevent it
Summary: Information about what food poisoning is, why it happens and what people that work with food can do to prevent it.

Title: Food safety during pregnancy
Summary: This brochure advices pregnant women which food groups should be included in their diet, which vitamins, nutrients and minerals the body needs and what foods and substances should be avoided because they can cause salmonella, listeria or bear other risks for a pregnant woman.

Title: Fridge food safety (video)
Summary: Fridges are great for keeping food (and beer) cold, but they can also be havens for bacteria if packed incorrectly.
So follow these simple tips to keep your fridge healthy:
- Make sure your fridge is set below 5 degrees Celsius
- Store all food in covered containers
- Always store raw meat, chicken and fish below other foods
- Defrost food in a container on the bottom shelf, not in the sink or on the benchtop
- Throw out packaged food which is past it’s use by date, if in doubt throw it out
- Clean fridge regularly with warm, soapy water

Title: FSS (Food Safety Supervisor) guidelines for registered training organisations (RTO)
Summary: The NSW Food Safety Supervisor (FSS) program was established to help reduce foodborne illness in the hospitality and retail food service sector by improving food handler skills and knowledge.

Title: Guideline for seafood retailers - Compliance with the food standards code
Summary: This guideline has been developed by the NSW Food Authority to assist seafood retailers in meeting the food safety and labelling requirement outlined in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code.

Title: Hand washing
Summary: 'Keep it clean' is one of the golden rules of food safety. This fact sheet shows how to wash your hands correctly.

Title: Hand washing tips (video)
Summary: Wash your hands. Sounds simple, but not doing it or doing it incorrectly can lead to illness.
So follow these simple tips to avoid making yourself sick:
- Always wash your hands every time you use the toilet
- Wash your hands before and during food preparation
Follow the 20/20 rule:
- 20 seconds washing with soap, rub and rinse with running water
- 20 seconds drying with a clean towel
This will ensure your hands don’t make you or anyone else sick.


Title: Health and hygiene requirements of food handlers
Summary: Under the Food Standards Code, a food handler must take all reasonable measures not to handle food or food surfaces in a way that is likely to compromise the safety and suitability of food. This factsheets outlines the specific responsibilties relating to health and hygiene.

Title: Keeping the kitchen clean (video)
Summary: In the kitchen, food poisoning bacteria are brought in on raw foods like chicken, meat and vegetables. Bacteria can also be transferred on work surfaces, cutting boards, knives and other kitchen equipment. So follow these simple tips to avoid cross contamination:
- Thoroughly clean food preparation surfaces
- Clean kitchen equipment properly during and after preparing foods, using warm soapy water
- Store raw meat, chicken and fish in the fridge below other foods
- Make sure all foods are covered when stored in the fridge
- Wash hands thoroughly before handling food and after handling raw foods


Title: Pest control in food businesses
Summary: Common pests such as rats, mice and cockroaches can carry bacteria and viruses, and can contaminate food and food contact surfaces. This fact sheet provides tips on how to avoid pests.

Title: Powers of authorised officers
Summary: The role of the NSW food authority is to ensure that food is safe and correctly labelled. This information sheet outlines the role and powers of an authorised officer.

Title: Protecting food from contamination
Summary: Contamination of food from objects, people, pests or chemicals can cause serious illness. Food businesses, by law, must take precautions to avoid causing harm to people who eat their food, This information sheet explains the common contaminants of food and provides tips on how to protect your food from contamination.

Title: Rotavirus immunisation information
Summary: This translated resource provides information on the Rotavirus, the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children in Australia. It includes information on the protection against rotavirus that is available free of charge under the National Immunisation Program Schedule for babies in two doses at two and four months of age. It also includes a pre-immunisation checklist and information on possible side effects.

Title: Salmonellosis guide
Summary: A guide to the foodborne disease, salmonellosis, including symptoms and prevention with good hygiene.

Title: Scores on doors buisness brochure: Hygiene and food safety NSW
Summary: Scores on doors is the NSW food hygiene scoring program that reassures customers about hygiene and food safety standards. All of the scoring levels that qualify for a certificate reassure customers your business has had its official hygiene and food safety inspection.

Title: Shigellosis
Summary: A guide to shigellosis, an infection caused by the Shigella bacteria, resulting in symptoms like diarrhoea, fever, nausea and stomach cramps. Inlucdes information on prevention and treatment.

Title: Tinea
Summary: Tinea is a highly contagious fungal infection that can infect the skin, affecting areas include the feet, groin, scalp and under the breasts. To ensure you receive the appropriate treatment and know about good hygiene to prevent the spread of tinea, read this information brochure.

Title: Use by and best before dates (video)
Summary: Remember that a 'use by' date means just that: use the product on or before that date. Food with a use by date can't legally be sold after that date. A 'best before' date means that the food may have lost some quality or nutrition after that date but it can be sold or eaten for a little while after that. There are slightly different rules for bread which can be labelled with a 'baked on' or 'baked before' date. Date marking will only work if you follow the storage instructions on the label. So if a product says refrigerate at or below 4 Celsius – do just that.

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