Khmer (Cambodian)
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Topic "Environmental Health" in Khmer (cambodian) - total 23 documents

Title: 10-year anniversary of the 2009 Victorian bushfires - Recovering from long-term trauma
Summary: Translated factsheets about recovering from long-term trauma in lead up to 10-year anniversary of the 2009 Victorian bushfires.

Title: Ash from a brown coal mine fire
Summary: The Department of Health and Human Services has prepared this general information so that you know what to do to protect your health and the health of anyone in your care who may come into contact with ash during or after a brown coal mine fire.

Title: Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria)
Summary: Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) are bacterial organisms that have some of the characteristics of bacteria and some of algae. They are present in almost all aquatic ecosystems in Australia, including rivers, lakes and estuaries. Under certain environmental conditions, blue-green algae concentrations in water can rapidly increase and form visible blooms or scums. Water affected by blue-green algae may be unsuitable for drinking, recreational activities such as swimming and fishing, and agricultural uses. Some species of blue-green algae produce toxins that are harmful to humans and animals when they are eaten, inhaled or contact the skin.

Title: Bushfire smoke and your health
Summary: Bushfire smoke can reduce air quality in rural and urban areas and may affect people’s health. This fact sheet provides information on bushfire smoke, how it can affect you and your family’s health, and actions that you can take to avoid or reduce potential health effects.

Title: Chemical emergencies - how to stay safe
Summary: A chemical emergency can happen anywhere, anytime, as the result of a fire, explosion or a chemical spill at a fixed site, or from a road or train accident. The best way to protect yourself in a chemical emergency is to shelter inside, shut all windows and doors and turn off any ventilation systems, and listen to emergency service broadcasts.

Title: Early fire safe fact sheet 1: how parents and caregivers can prevent burns and scalds
Summary: How parents and caregivers can prevent burns and scalds

Title: Early fire safe fact sheet 2: tips around the home
Summary: Fire safe behaviour is reliant on the awareness of risk and knowing what to do to reduce that risk. Adequate supervision and positive role modelling for young children is very important. Parents and carers can help reduce this risk by controlling or removing possible fire hazards around the home.

Title: Early fire safe fact sheet 3: understanding burn and scald injuries
Summary: Understanding burn and scald injuries.

Title: Early fire safe fact sheet 4: be prepared for a fire
Summary: Advice on how to be prepared for a fire

Title: Fire danger ratings
Summary: The fire danger rating tells you how dangerous a fire would be if one started. It helps you to know when conditions are dangerous enough to put your bushfire survival plan in to action.

Title: Fire orders: what to do in case of fire
Summary: This fact sheet lists the 6 steps you need to do in case of a fire

Title: Fire safety for older people and people with disability
Summary: A translated brochure that has been designed to assist older people or people with disability to reduce their risk of fire and harm from fires. It encourages consideration of early warning, how to respond to a fire and other advice to help reduce risk.

Title: Grassfires: know your fire risk and know what to do (bilingual version)
Summary: This factsheet lists some risks and how to reduce them as well as what you need to do if a grassfire starts.

Title: Home fire safety
Summary: Most fatal fires occur in the home, but the real tragedy is that many of these could be avoided. This brochure provides a checklist on preventative measures you can undertake to minimise the chance of a fire in your house.

Title: Home fire safety (audio version)
Summary: Most fatal fires occur in the home, but the real tragedy is that many of these could be avoided. This brochures provides a checklist on preventative measures you can undertake to minimise the chance of a fire in your house.

Title: Never leave kids in cars
Summary: Never leave your most precious valuables, your children, alone in the car.The never leave kids in cars campaign prompts parents to take their kids with them whenever they get out of the car, just as they do their everyday valuables, to avoid potentially tragic consequences.

Title: Outdoor safety: home safety and injury prevention
Summary: Information on how to ensure safe outdoor playing for children

Title: Smoke and your health
Summary: Smoke from fires can reduce air quality in rural and urban areas and exposure to smoke can affect you and your family's health. Find out more about how smoke can affect your health and the actions you can take to avoid or reduce potential health effects.

Title: Smoke from a brown coal mine fire
Summary: The Department of Health and Human Services has prepared this general information so that you know what to do to protect your health and the health of anyone in your care who may be exposed to smoke from a brown coal mine fire

Title: Smoke from a landfill fire
Summary: The Department of Health and Human Services has prepared this general information so that you know what to do to protect your health and the health of anyone in your care who may be exposed to smoke from a landfill fire.

Title: Smoke from a peat fire
Summary: The Department of Health and Human Services has prepared this general information so that you know what to do to protect your health and the health of anyone in your care who may be exposed to smoke from a peat fire. Peat fires are uncommon and generally occur in locations away from populated areas. Peat fires smoulder for a long time and can be difficult to put out. Smoke contains fine particles, water vapour and gases including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Some peat fires may produce sulfur compounds which can be odourous.

Title: Smoke from a tyre fire
Summary: The Department of Health and Human Services has prepared this general information so that you know what to do to protect your health and the health of anyone in your care who may be exposed to smoke from a tyre fire. Tyres are made of vulcanised rubber, steel and textiles. Tyre fires create large amounts of thick black smoke and can be difficult to put out. Smoke from a tyre fire contains a number of substances, including fine particles, oxides of sulfur, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

Title: Survive the heat: brochure
Summary: The "Survive the heat" brochure contains information on how individuals can take care of themselves and look out for family, friends and neighbours who may need help coping with the heat.

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