Macedonian
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Topic "Cancer" in Macedonian - total 46 documents

Title: A guide to understanding your cervical screening test results
Summary: This translated booklet provides you with information to help you better understand your Cervical Screening Test results. Your healthcare provider will discuss your results and the next steps with you. It is important that if you experience symptoms at any time, such as abnormal vaginal bleeding, pain or discharge, you should see your healthcare provider immediately.

Title: After a diagnosis of breast cancer
Summary: This fact sheet explains how breast cancer is treated.

Title: After a diagnosis of cervical cancer (bilingual version)
Summary: This factsheet talks about treatment options and your health and wellbeing after a diagnosis of cervical cancer.

Title: After a diagnosis of prostate cancer
Summary: This factsheet talks about treatment options and your health and wellbeing

Title: After diagnosis of ovarian cancer
Summary: This factsheet explains treatment for ovarian cancer.

Title: Alcohol and cancer prevention
Summary: There is convincing evidence that drinking alcohol increases the risk of cancers of the bowel, breast, mouth, throat, voice box, oesophagus (food pipe) and liver. Even drinking small amounts of alcohol increases your cancer risk. The more you drink, the greater the risk. If you choose to drink, limit your intake.

Title: Be sunsmart
Summary: The major cause of skin cancer is too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun. This information sheet outlines how you can protect yourself against sun damage.

Title: Breast changes - what's normal
Summary: Breasts changes occur over a woman's life. This translated information sheet will explain what normal changes are and why they have occurred.

Title: Breastscreening - is breastscreening for you?
Summary: This translated pamphlet provides general information about breastscreening, its purpose and safety.

Title: Chemotherapy safety at home
Summary: If you have chemotherapy at home, you should use the precautions described in the patient information sheet.

Title: Complementary therapies and cancer
Summary: You may hear about, or become interested in, complementary therapies. There are many therapies available. This fact sheet has information to help you make informed and safe choices.

Title: Coping with a cancer diagnosis
Summary: Everyone reacts to a diagnosis of cancer differently. It is often difficult to take in the diagnosis immediately. It is natural to ask “why me?” or to feel sad, angry, helpless and worried.

Title: Cut your cancer risk
Summary: Provides a summary of the 7 key cancer prevention messages including: get checked, limit alcohol, eat a healthy diet, be active, be a healthy weight, be active, be SunSmart and quit smoking.

Title: Early detection of breast cancer
Summary: This resource explains how to detect for breast cancer early.

Title: Early detection of ovarian cancer
Summary: This fact sheet explains how to detect ovarian cancer.

Title: Early detection of prostate cancer
Summary: This factsheet explains how to find out if you have prostate cancer.

Title: Eat for health
Summary: About one-third of cancers are linked to lifestyle factors, such as a poor diet, smoking and lack of exercise. You can lower your risk of developing cancer by enjoying a nutritious diet every day.

Title: For people with cancer, their families and friends - the following support services may assist you
Summary: The document lists support services which assist people with cancer, their family and friends: Written Material, Free information sessions, Cancer Connect , Cancer Council Helpline, Cancer information in your language, Cancer Support Groups

Title: Home test kit instructions - National Bowel Cancer Screening Program
Summary: There are 4 easy steps to completing a home test kit for bowel cancer. Find out what the kit contains and how to do the test.

Title: Living well after cancer
Summary: Many people with cancer are successfully treated or cured. It’s common for people to live a long time after treatment. People who have finished treatment may be called ‘cancer survivors’.

Title: Men and cancer prevention
Summary: This fact sheet talks about a cancer prevention plan for men.

Title: Move your body
Summary: About one-third of cancers are linked to lifestyle factors, such as a poor diet, smoking and lack of exercise. You can lower your risk of developing cancer by being physically active every day

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - colonoscopy (brochure)
Summary: This brochure explains what a colonoscopy is and how it is done. It outlines how to prepare and what happens after the test.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - information booklet
Summary: This booklet provides information about the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program. It tells you about bowel cancer, the screening process and what happens after you get your results.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - invitation letter
Summary: People aged 50 to 74 will receive this letter in the mail, along with a bowel cancer screening test kit. This is part of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - Invitation letter for 73 to 74 year olds
Summary: People aged 73 to 74 will receive this letter in the mail, along with their final bowel cancer screening test kit. This is part of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - Lifesaver (brochure)
Summary: This brochure provides some simple facts about bowel cancer and the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - Lifesaver (poster)
Summary: This A3-sized poster encourages people to take part in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - Lifesaver fact sheet
Summary: This fact sheet provides some simple facts about bowel cancer and the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - Pre-invite letter
Summary: This letter tells people about the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program and encourages them to participate.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - Results notification letter - negative
Summary: This language set contains translations of a letter sent to people who have done the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program test to tell them their test was negative.

Title: National Bowel Cancer Screening Program - Results notification letter - positive
Summary: This is an example of the letter sent to people who have done the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program test to tell them their test was positive and what they need to do next.

Title: National Cervical Screening Program – Self-collection and the cervical screening test
Summary: This language set contains translations of a fact sheet that helps health professionals discuss whether self-collection may be an option for participants in the National Cervical Screening Program. It is usually provided during a consultation.

Title: Put your health first
Summary: This translated pamphlet provides general information about breastscreening and how to book an appointment.

Title: Questions to ask your doctor
Summary: Although your doctor and other health care professionals may give you advice, you should consider your care a partnership.

Title: Quit smoking
Summary: Quitting smoking is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your cancer risk. Tobacco contains more than 7000 chemicals, including over 70 chemicals known to cause cancer.

Title: Stay in shape
Summary: We know that by maintaining a healthy body weight, being physically active every day and enjoying a healthy diet, you can lower your risk of developing cancer. We know that these factors account for at least 30 per cent of all cancers.

Title: The pap test has changed: more accurate, less often
Summary: Cervical screening has changed in Australia. The Pap test has been replaced with a new Cervical Screening Test every five years. The latest medical and scientific evidence shows that having a Cervical Screening Test every five years is just as safe, and is more effective than having a Pap test every two years.

Title: Understanding brain tumour (bilingual version)
Summary: This factsheet talks about the types of brain tumours and their treatment options.

Title: Understanding cancer surgery (bilingual version)
Summary: Surgery is one of the main treatments for cancer. More than half of all people diagnosed with cancer have an operation.

Title: Understanding chemotherapy
Summary: This patient information sheet explains what chemotherapy is and who decides if chemotherapy is needed. It also includes a useful list of things to ask your doctor as well as your right to ask for an interpreter and a small glossary of useful words.

Title: Understanding radiation therapy
Summary: Being prepared and knowing more about radiation therapy can help lessen some of the stress surrounding your treatment. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of radiation therapy.

Title: Understanding the faecal occult blood test
Summary: This factsheet explains what is the faecal occult blood test and what happens during the test.

Title: What is cancer screening? (Fact sheet)
Summary: Cancer screening involves simple tests that look for early signs of cancer, or the conditions that cause cancer. Screening tests can find cancer before you can see or feel any changes to your body. When you find cancer early, it is easier to treat successfully. This fact sheet summerises the three different screening processes for breast- bowel and cervical cancer.

Title: What is cancer?
Summary: Explains what cancer is, how it beings and how it spreads.

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