Korean
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Topic "Food And Nutrition" in Korean - total 44 documents

Title: 5 ways to a healthy lifestyle
Summary: With good food habits and daily physical activity you will be well on your way to a healthy life. Easy to say, but sometimes not so easy to do!Our busy lifestyles can be hard on our family’s health. Rushing to and from school and work can make it hard to find time to be physically active. We can also slip into the habit of choosing unhealthy snacks and take-away foods or spending our free time watching TV or in front of the computer.

Title: BBQ food safety (video)
Summary: Everyone loves a BBQ, but no one likes getting food poisoning So follow these simple tips to make you BBQ a hit: 1. Keep all food cold and covered until ready to be used 2. Use different plates and utensils for raw and cooked foods 3. Make sure all meats are cooked right the way through so juices run clear 4. Continually replace dips and salads if they’ve been out of the fridge for long 5. Keep food cool and covered when not being severed 6. And don’t keep left overs if they’ve been out of the fridge for more than two hours

Title: Bottle and formula preparation
Summary: This short video shows you how to prepare baby formula and expressed breastmilk for bottle-feeding to newborns and young babies

Title: Breastfeeding and returning to work
Summary: This translated brochure is one of fourteen full colour brochures covering the essential healthy eating and physical activity topics to support settings, staff and families.

Title: Caffeine and your health
Summary: How caffeine, found in coffee, tea, chocolate, cocoa and in cola drinks, can affect health.

Title: Choose water as a drink
Summary: Drinking water is the best way to quench your thirst. Even better, it doesn’t come with all the sugar and energy (kilojoules) found in fruit juice drinks, soft drinks, sports drinks and flavoured mineral waters. This factsheet also provides Ideas to help you to drink more water

Title: Cooking for children book
Summary: Provides information and advice on early childhood nutrition, menu planning and food safety. Contains delicious and nutritious recipes for settings and families.

Title: Cooler food safety (video)
Summary: Coolers are a great way to transport your food and drinks, but a poorly packed cooler is also a great way to get sick. So follow these simple steps:
- Choose a cooler with excellent insulation and make sure it’s clean.
- Keep your food in the fridge until just before you’re ready to leave.
- Pack meats, fish and chicken in containers and place at the bottom of the cooler.
- Add cold packs or frozen drinks on top and use a tight fitting lid.


Title: Directors/coordinators book
Summary: The most detailed of all the Guidelines resources. Provides practical information and advice on early childhood healthy eating and physical activity, how to develop nutrition and physical activity policies and ways to support and encourage staff, carers and families.

Title: Eat more fruit and vegies
Summary: Eating fruit and vegetables every day will help your child grow strong and healthy. Children aged 2-3 years should eat 1 serve of fruit and 2.5 serves of vegetables and children aged 4-8 years should eat 1.5 serves of fruit and 4.5 serves of vegetables, each day. (Approximately half of these amounts for toddlers aged 1-2 years).

Title: Eating well for a pregnancy: tips to get enough folic acid and iodine (video)
Summary: Good nutrition during pregnancy will help to keep a developing baby and its mother healthy. The need for certain nutrients, such as iron, iodine and folic acid, is increased at this time but only a small amount of extra kilojoules is needed. It is important to choose a wide variety of foods to ensure the nutritional needs of both mother and baby are met.

Title: Family Book
Summary: Provides families with practical information and advice to support healthy eating and encourage physical activity in young children.

Title: First foods: food from home
Summary: This brochure is one of fourteen full colour brochures covering the essential healthy eating and physical activity topics to support settings, staff and families.

Title: First foods: food provided by the early childhood setting
Summary: At around six months of age, a diet of breastmilk or formula alone no longer meets infants’ nutritional requirements. Other foods are needed to complement milk-feeds.

Title: Fitting more fruit and vegetables into your diet
Summary: If you’re not eating at least two pieces of fruit and five servings of vegetables each day, now’s the time to start. Although there’s no single “miracle” food to prevent or cure cancer, scientists know fruit and vegetables have some protective effect against this and other diseases. They also know that people who eat few fruits and vegetables have higher rates of cancer than those who don’t. Although some people think they can get the same benefits from vitamin and mineral supplements, this isn’t true. Vegetables and fruits don’t just contain vitamins and minerals, but also many other substances which are important for good health and which you won’t find in a pill.

Title: Folic acid and pregnancy (video)
Summary: If you are thinking about having a baby, or could become pregnant, you need to know about folic acid. Folic acid is important to the healthy development of babies in early pregnancy.

Title: Food allergens (video)
Summary: Some food ingredients can cause severe allergic reactions to some people, this is known as anaphylaxis. Food which contains peanuts, tree nuts such as cashews, walnuts or almonds, shellfish, fish, milk, eggs, sesame or soybeans or their products must be labelled however small the amount. Gluten must also be labelled for those with coeliac disease. Sulphite preserves must also be labelled if there is more than 10 milligrams per kilogram. This is because it can trigger asthma attacks in some asthmatics at that level. There is more information about food allergies on the Anaphylaxis Australia website or on Allergy New Zealand’s website.

Title: Food allergy and intolerance
Summary: This brochure will give you information on managing food allergies and intolerances including buying food, eating out and information on where you can get more help.

Title: Food ideas for busy parents
Summary: This brochure is one of fourteen full colour brochures covering the essential healthy eating and physical activity topics to support settings, staff and families.

Title: Food safety rules A3 poster
Summary: A poster describing food safety rules.

Title: Food safety rules A4 poster
Summary: A poster describing food safety rules.

Title: Foodborne disease
Summary: Causes of foodborne disease (food poisoning) and how good hygiene helps prevent infection.

Title: Fridge food safety (video)
Summary: Fridges are great for keeping food (and beer) cold, but they can also be havens for bacteria if packed incorrectly.
So follow these simple tips to keep your fridge healthy:
- Make sure your fridge is set below 5 degrees Celsius
- Store all food in covered containers
- Always store raw meat, chicken and fish below other foods
- Defrost food in a container on the bottom shelf, not in the sink or on the benchtop
- Throw out packaged food which is past it’s used by date, if in doubt throw it out
- Clean fridge regularly with warm, soapy water

Title: Fuss free mealtimes
Summary: This factsheet provides tips to help parents feed fussy eaters.

Title: Hand washing tips (video)
Summary: Wash your hands. Sounds simple, but not doing it or doing it incorrectly can lead to illness.
So follow these simple tips to avoid making yourself sick:
- Always wash your hands every time you use the toilet
- Wash your hands before and during food preparation
Follow the 20/20 rule:
- 20 seconds washing with soap, rub and rinse with running water
- 20 seconds drying with a clean towel
This will ensure your hands don’t make you or anyone sick.


Title: Have you had an allergic reaction to packaged food - A5 poster
Summary: Food labels are required by law to carry essential information so that people know what is in the food they buy. The role of the Food Safety Unit at the Department of Health and Human Services is to ensure that food sold in Victoria is safe. We can investigate and test food for allergens that are not described on the food label.

Title: Healthy diet and bowels
Summary: This translated resource is to encourage a healthy diet with a high fibre intake, which can help in protect people against diverticular disease, haemorrhoids, constipation and chronic disease such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. It provides information on what fibre is, what foods contain fibre and how much to be eating.

Title: Healthy eating and arthritis
Summary: This sheet has been written to address some common myths about food and arthritis. It provides general information about healthy eating and where to go for further information and advice. It does not provide specific advice for people with other medical conditions or food intolerances.

Title: Healthy eating and physical activity for early childhood: staff/carers book
Summary: Provides practical information and advice on early childhood healthy eating and physical activity to all staff and carers in early childhood settings.

Title: How breastfeeding works
Summary: Breastfeeding Booklets in 8 languages featuring side-by-side Language/English Translation. Good for health professionals and mothers to read together. They appreciate being able to work together on an issue and read the same information in their own languages – this helps to overcome communication barriers where English language proficiency and/or specific terms related to breastfeeding are limitations to accessing breastfeeding support. The information is clear, in easy to read, non-medical language and is detailed enough but brief. The clear diagrams and use of full colour photographs also make them appealing. Topics include expressing & storing breastmilk, colostrum, sore nipples, weaning, engorgement, increasing supply, attachment, working & breastfeeding.

Title: Infant formula
Summary: This brochure is one of fourteen full colour brochures covering the essential healthy eating and physical activity topics to support settings, staff and families.

Title: Ingredient list, percentage labelling and food additives (video)
Summary: Food products contain ingredient lists than can usually be found on the back of food products. Ingredients must be listed in descending order by ingoing weight at the time of manufacture – so essentially the greatest ingredient is first and the least last. The ingredient list will also probably show a percentage of the main or ‘characterising’ ingredient, such as the meat in a meat pie or strawberries in strawberry yoghurt.

Title: Iodine and pregnancy (video)
Summary: If you are thinking about having a baby, or could become pregnant, you need to know about iodine supplements. In Australia and New Zealand there has recently been a re-emergence of iodine deficiency. Iodine is an essential mineral that we get from the food we eat. While dairy foods and seafood are good sources of iodine, the amount of iodine in our diet depends on how much iodine is in the soil. A diet low in iodine may lead to a number of health problems. Iodine is particularly important for pregnant and breastfeeding women, the developing baby in the womb, babies and young children are at the greatest risk.

Title: Keeping the kitchen clean (video)
Summary: In the kitchen, food poisoning bacteria are brought in on raw foods like chicken, meat and vegetables. Bacteria can also be transferred on work surfaces, cutting boards, knives and other kitchen equipment. So follow these simple tips to avoid cross contamination:
- Thoroughly clean food preparation surfaces
- Clean kitchen equipment properly during and after preparing foods, using warm soapy water
- Store raw meat, chicken and fish in the fridge below other foods
- Make sure all foods are covered when stored in the fridge
- Wash hands thoroughly before handling food and after handling raw foods


Title: Listeriosis
Summary: A guide to preventing listeria infection or listeriosis, a rare but serious foodborne disease.

Title: Lunchbox Ideas: meals for early childhood settings
Summary: This brochure is one of fourteen full colour brochues covering the essential healthy eating and physical activity topics to support settings, staff and families.

Title: Mercury in fish (video)
Summary: The Australian Dietary Guidelines say that everyone should eat one or two fish meals per week for good health. The good news is that it is safe for everyone to eat 2-3 serves per week of most types of fish. shark, marlin and swordfish should only be eaten once a week by the general population because they have levels of naturally occurring mercury.

Title: Nutrition & kidney failure
Summary: When you have chronic kidney disease, diet can be an important part of your treatment. Your recommended diet may change overtime if your kidney condition or medical treatment changes.

Title: Nutrition panels (video)
Summary: Nutrition information panels can be found on nearly all packaged foods. They list the energy in kilojoules, the protein, the total fats and saturated fats, the total carbohydrates and sugar, and the sodium which is salt. There are two columns: one by serve and the other by 100 grams. The 100 gram column can help you choose healthier products as you can compare similar foods.

Title: Positive eating practices
Summary: This brochure is one of fourteen full colour brochures covering the essential healthy eating and physical activity topics to support settings, staff and families.

Title: Shigellosis
Summary: A guide to shigellosis, an infection caused by the Shigella bacteria, resulting in symptoms like diarrhoea, fever, nausea and stomach cramps. Inlucdes information on prevention and treatment.

Title: The importance of drinking water
Summary: This brochure is one of fourteen full colour brochures covering the essential healthy eating and physical activity topics to support settings, staff and families.

Title: Use by and best before dates (video)
Summary: Remember that a 'use by' date means just that: use the product on or before that date. Food with a use by date can't legally be sold after that date. A 'best before' date means that the food may have lost some quality or nutrition after that date but it can be sold or eaten for a little while after that. There are slightly different rules for bread which can be labelled with a 'baked on' or 'baked before' date. Date marking will only work if you follow the storage instructions on the label. So if a product says refrigerate at or below 4 Celsius – do just that.

Title: Warning to pregnant and breastfeeding women: seaweed soup
Summary: Information pamphlet warning women of the extremely high levels of iodine in seaweed soup, this soup is often given to pregnant and breastfeeding women from Korea, Japan and some parts of China in the belief that it increases breastmilk supply. This soup can have iodine level hundreds of times higher than the recommended daily intake. High levels of iodine intake can cause hypothyroidism in newborn babies.

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