Chinese (Simplified)
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Topic "Food And Nutrition" in Chinese (simplified) - total 35 documents

Title: BBQ food safety (video)
Summary: Everyone loves a BBQ, but no one likes getting food poisoning So follow these simple tips to make you BBQ a hit: 1. Keep all food cold and covered until ready to be used 2. Use different plates and utensils for raw and cooked foods 3. Make sure all meats are cooked right the way through so juices run clear 4. Continually replace dips and salads if they’ve been out of the fridge for long 5. Keep food cool and covered when not being severed 6. And don’t keep left overs if they’ve been out of the fridge for more than two hours

Title: Bottle and formula preparation
Summary: This short video shows you how to prepare baby formula and expressed breastmilk for bottle-feeding to newborns and young babies

Title: Calcium consumer guide
Summary: This guide covers calcium and your bones, calcium requirements at different stages of life, the calcium content of some foods, tips for getting more calcium, how calcium is absorbed, supplements and their side effects and osteoporosis.

Title: Chief Health Officer advisory on egg safety for restaurants cafes and caterers
Summary: Eggs are a highly nutritious food, used in many different recipes and ways. However, like meat, seafood and dairy products, eggs have the potential to be hazardous. To reduce the risk of making your customers ill, particular care must be taken to handle and store eggs and raw egg products safely.

Title: Community groups fundraising events food safety obligations
Summary: A video to help community groups and not-for profit groups understand what they need to do to ensure the provision of safe food at their fundraising event.

Title: Cooler food safety (video)
Summary: Coolers are a great way to transport your food and drinks, but a poorly packed cooler is also a great way to get sick. So follow these simple steps:
- Choose a cooler with excellent insulation and make sure it’s clean.
- Keep your food in the fridge until just before you’re ready to leave.
- Pack meats, fish and chicken in containers and place at the bottom of the cooler.
- Add cold packs or frozen drinks on top and use a tight fitting lid.


Title: Eat for health
Summary: We know that by enjoying a healthy diet, being physically active every day and maintaining a healthy body weight, you can lower your risk of developing cancer. We know that these factors account for at least 30 per cent of all cancers.

Title: Eating disorders in Australia
Summary: This Fact Sheet on eating disorders has been developed from evidence-based information through collaboration with National Eating Disorders Collaboration staff and eating disorders experts.

Title: Eating well for a pregnancy: tips to get enough folic acid and iodine (video)
Summary: Good nutrition during pregnancy will help to keep a developing baby and its mother healthy. The need for certain nutrients, such as iron, iodine and folic acid, is increased at this time but only a small amount of extra kilojoules is needed. It is important to choose a wide variety of foods to ensure the nutritional needs of both mother and baby are met.

Title: Folic acid and pregnancy (video)
Summary: If you are thinking about having a baby, or could become pregnant, you need to know about folic acid. Folic acid is important to the healthy development of babies in early pregnancy.

Title: Food allergens (video)
Summary: Some food ingredients can cause severe allergic reactions to some people, this is known as anaphylaxis. Food which contains peanuts, tree nuts such as cashews, walnuts or almonds, shellfish, fish, milk, eggs, sesame or soybeans or their products must be labelled however small the amount. Gluten must also be labelled for those with coeliac disease. Sulphite preserves must also be labelled if there is more than 10 milligrams per kilogram. This is because it can trigger asthma attacks in some asthmatics at that level. There is more information about food allergies on the Anaphylaxis Australia website or on Allergy New Zealand’s website.

Title: Food safety rules A3 poster
Summary: A poster describing food safety rules.

Title: Food safety rules A4 poster
Summary: A poster describing food safety rules.

Title: Food safety supervisor fact sheet
Summary: The following section provides a step-by-step guide to whether your business needs a food safety supervisor, and if so, how to ensure they meet your businesses requirements.

Title: Fridge food safety (video)
Summary: Fridges are great for keeping food (and beer) cold, but they can also be havens for bacteria if packed incorrectly.
So follow these simple tips to keep your fridge healthy:
- Make sure your fridge is set below 5 degrees Celsius
- Store all food in covered containers
- Always store raw meat, chicken and fish below other foods
- Defrost food in a container on the bottom shelf, not in the sink or on the benchtop
- Throw out packaged food which is past it’s used by date, if in doubt throw it out
- Clean fridge regularly with warm, soapy water

Title: Getting your child to eat breakfast
Summary: Need breakfast ideas for kids? Our guide to getting kids to eat breakfast has healthy breakfast ideas ideas and explains why breakfast is important for kids.

Title: Hand washing tips (video)
Summary: Wash your hands. Sounds simple, but not doing it or doing it incorrectly can lead to illness.
So follow these simple tips to avoid making yourself sick:
- Always wash your hands every time you use the toilet
- Wash your hands before and during food preparation
Follow the 20/20 rule:
- 20 seconds washing with soap, rub and rinse with running water
- 20 seconds drying with a clean towel
This will ensure your hands don’t make you or anyone sick.


Title: Have you had an allergic reaction to packaged food - A5 poster
Summary: Food labels are required by law to carry essential information so that people know what is in the food they buy. The role of the Food Safety Unit at the Department of Health and Human Services is to ensure that food sold in Victoria is safe. We can investigate and test food for allergens that are not described on the food label.

Title: Healthy diet and bowels
Summary: This translated resource is to encourage a healthy diet with a high fibre intake, which can help in protect people against diverticular disease, haemorrhoids, constipation and chronic disease such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. It provides information on what fibre is, what foods contain fibre and how much to be eating.

Title: Healthy eating clip
Summary: The healthy eating clip/video has been translated to communicate healthy eating messages such as different food groups and healthy cooking methods. This resource may be beneficial for those living with diabetes.

Title: Healthy eating factsheet
Summary: This translated fact sheet highlights that healthy eating is about enjoying a variety of foods from each of the five food groups. The fact sheet may be a great resource for those living with diabetes and require more information on the food groups.

Title: Healthy eating for pregnancy: in pictures
Summary: Healthy eating in pregnancy means lots of fruit, vegetables and foods with calcium, protein and iron. Avoid sugary, fatty foods, and drink plenty of water.

Title: Heart healthy tips
Summary: Nutritional tips for a healthy heart

Title: Ingredient list, percentage labelling and food additives (video)
Summary: Food products contain ingredient lists than can usually be found on the back of food products. Ingredients must be listed in descending order by ingoing weight at the time of manufacture – so essentially the greatest ingredient is first and the least last. The ingredient list will also probably show a percentage of the main or ‘characterising’ ingredient, such as the meat in a meat pie or strawberries in strawberry yoghurt.

Title: Iodine and pregnancy (video)
Summary: If you are thinking about having a baby, or could become pregnant, you need to know about iodine supplements. In Australia and New Zealand there has recently been a re-emergence of iodine deficiency. Iodine is an essential mineral that we get from the food we eat. While dairy foods and seafood are good sources of iodine, the amount of iodine in our diet depends on how much iodine is in the soil. A diet low in iodine may lead to a number of health problems. Iodine is particularly important for pregnant and breastfeeding women, the developing baby in the womb, babies and young children are at the greatest risk.

Title: Keeping the kitchen clean (video)
Summary: In the kitchen, food poisoning bacteria are brought in on raw foods like chicken, meat and vegetables. Bacteria can also be transferred on work surfaces, cutting boards, knives and other kitchen equipment. So follow these simple tips to avoid cross contamination:
- Thoroughly clean food preparation surfaces
- Clean kitchen equipment properly during and after preparing foods, using warm soapy water
- Store raw meat, chicken and fish in the fridge below other foods
- Make sure all foods are covered when stored in the fridge
- Wash hands thoroughly before handling food and after handling raw foods


Title: Kilojoules on the menu (video)
Summary: Kilojoule labelling is now on the menu of large food chain businesses – both in-store and online. This includes fast food or chain restaurants that sell things like burgers, pizza, fried chicken, pasta, sushi and noodles. It also applies to drink, café and bakery chains. From 1 May 2018, large Victorian fast food and supermarket chains are required to display the kilojoule content of ready-to-eat food and drinks on their menus and food tags. They will also need to show the average adult daily energy intake, which is 8,700kJ. The average fast food meal may contain over half the kilojoules needed for the day. You may be eating far too many kilojoules without realising it. Kilojoule labelling will make it easier for you to make healthier food choices when eating out and taking away food and drinks.

Title: Mercury in fish (video)
Summary: The Australian Dietary Guidelines say that everyone should eat one or two fish meals per week for good health. The good news is that it is safe for everyone to eat 2-3 serves per week of most types of fish. shark, marlin and swordfish should only be eaten once a week by the general population because they have levels of naturally occurring mercury.

Title: Milk and young children
Summary: A guide to help parents encourage healthy eating in children over 12 months who want more milk than they need.

Title: Tooth tips [0-12 months]
Summary: Tooth tips 0 - 12 months, for parents, grandparents and carers. Eat well. Drink well. Early feeding. Clean well. Teething. Tips for temporary relief.

Title: Tooth tips [12 - 18 months]
Summary: Tooth tips for children 1 to 2 years of age, for parents, grandparents and carers. Eat well. Drink well. Clean well. Thumb and finger sucking

Title: Tooth tips [18 months - 6 years]
Summary: Tooth tips for 2 to 6 years old. Aimed at parents, grandparents and carers. Eat well. Drink well. Clean well. Dental visits. Tips on toothbrushing. Did you know?

Title: Unplanned weight loss - information for residents, families and carers
Summary: A translated resource with information about the risks and prevention of unplanned weight loss for residents, families and carers.

Title: Use by and best before dates (video)
Summary: Remember that a 'use by' date means just that: use the product on or before that date. Food with a use by date can't legally be sold after that date. A 'best before' date means that the food may have lost some quality or nutrition after that date but it can be sold or eaten for a little while after that. There are slightly different rules for bread which can be labelled with a 'baked on' or 'baked before' date. Date marking will only work if you follow the storage instructions on the label. So if a product says refrigerate at or below 4 Celsius – do just that.

Title: Vitamin D consumer guide
Summary: A guide to Vitamin D with information on sun exposure, deficiency, supplements and food.

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